Stirling Moss Scrapbook 1955 - Contest Give-Away
Highlights

Announcing Limited Edition of Stirling Moss Scrapbook 1955

At Sir Stirling’s suggestion, Porter Press have reprinted their most popular Scrapbook on the 60th anniversary of his amazing 1955 year which of course included the Mille Miglia win and first GP victory. The first editions are already going up in price; they have limited it to just 900 second edition copies. The first of a series of Stirling Moss scrapbooks which now includes as separate volumes 1926-54, 1956-60, and 1961, the 1955 Scrapbook evokes memories of the heyday of classic motorsport. Stirling Moss is a national treasure. Arguably the world’s greatest all-round racing driver, he was a hero to several generations of schoolboys and enthusiasts throughout the world. Moss is now so iconic his name is often used as a metaphor for “racing driver” – the name alone invokes mental images of speed, bravado, the jet-set lifestyle and a […]

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Classic Cars

New Motoring Classics Magazine

The new Spring 2015 issue of Motoring Classics magazine is out now. If you haven’t been reading Motoring Classics, you owe it to yourself to check it out. This electronic magazine is published four times per year by the good folks at British Motor Heritage. Not only is Motoring Classics a quality publication so well worth reading no matter what, but it is also free. Yes, absolutely free. It is electronic only, but you can read it on your PC, Mac, iPad, Android tablet or most any other device. On the iOS platform there is even a separate custom app to read the magazine. This month’s issue contains articles on competition, manufacturers, and even the business of renting classic cars to the movie and television industry. Looks like renting your car out might be an interesting way of helping to […]

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Classic Cars

British Leyland – From Steam Wagons to Seventies Strife

British Leyland – The History, the Engineering, the People is a book for those of us with a love hate relationship with the ubiquitous British Leyland. During the 1960s vehicle makers all over the world were looking to expand and amalgamate as at the time it was considered the only way they could survive. As a major manufacturing nation Britain at the time had a large number of makers of all kinds of vehicles and gradually many of them joined together to form two large companies. The first of these was the Leyland Motor Corporation which was principally involved with the manufacture of commercial vehicles although they had also recently diversified into cars. The other major concern was British Motor Holdings, owners of some of Britain’s iconic car makes including Austin, Morris, Wolseley and Riley to name but a few. […]

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Highlights

British Sports Cars

The spirit of the British sports car tradition is reflected in the aesthetics of Schlegelmilch’s photography and in Lehbrink’s knowledgeable text in British Sports Cars. I am not sure whether to classify this book as a coffee table book because of the beautiful photography or a reference book due to the exhaustive cataloging of the cars and their features. Whichever way you go though, the works is both fascinating and of very hight quality. Without reading a word, I can sit and stare at the imagery for ages. Of the authors, this is said, “There is a persistent rumour that Rainer Schlegelmilch’s birth was initiated on the back seat of a Mercedes Benz 170V. Whether or not this is the source of his ongoing affinity to anything that has four wheels, his fascination with cars is vividly expressed in his […]

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Highlights

Art Deco and British Car Design

You may think of the French as producing the most strikingly streamlined cars of the 1930s, in lyric teardrop bodies hammered out with doses of Italian style and German science. But in his book “Art Deco and British Car Design: The Airline Cars of the 1930s“, Barrie Down reminds us that streamline design was the rage among car buffs everywhere in the ’30s, even in upright, country-house, Evelyn Waugh Britain. Mr. Down reminds us that at the same time streamline cars were going on the market, ocean liners and trains were being streamlined, the better to compete with the nascent airline industry. His book also reminds us that the automobile industry of the time in Britain had yet to embrace mass production. Cars were sold to the few, and the sellers were coachbuilders as much as chassis or engine makers. […]

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Classic Cars

MG Sedans Had A Sporty Charm

There is an excellent article over on Driving.Ca by Bill Vance about some of our favorite cars, the MG sedans of the 50s and 60s. As the article says, “The MG name is inextricably associated with the sporty, two-passenger British roadster, a car that laid the foundation for the North American sports car movement following the Second World War. What is less well known is that MG also made some interesting sedans before the war — including the 1937-1939 2.3-litre SA — and after. The post-war sedans were imported to North America.” Often these were badge engineered with other marks such as Morris, Austin, and Wolseley. From those early SAs all the way up through the MG 1100s and 1300s, these sedans while not well known in the US had a great following at home in the UK. Please head […]